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Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Ruins of the Church of St. Paul


One of the most recognizable, dramatic, and popular icons of the city of Macau are the Ruins of St Paul's Cathedral. Originally constructed in 1580 by Jesuit priests, the church was twice ravaged by fire in 1595 and 1601. Not to be deterred by the loss, construction resumed in 1602 and ultimately grew into what would be the largest Christian church on the entire Asian continent. As fate would have it, however, disaster met the church once again in 1835 when fire ripped through the soaring cathedral for the third and final time.


Red Carp Pond


Recognized as one of the “Ten Scenes of the West Lake,” the “Viewing Fish at Flower Harbor” refers to the practice of watching thousands of red carp swim in unison in a spot known as Red Carp Pond. Located at the center of this 50 acre park, the red cloud of fish creates a unique contrast to the serene and calming atmosphere which draws visitors to Hangzhou’s Flower Harbor in droves.


Roluos Group


The 3 main temples of Roluos stand apart from the main attractions around Siem Reap, lying to the west of the town rather than on the main northern axis. They’re also significantly older, dating from the 9th century when this area was known as Hariharalaya.


Preah Khan


Preah Khan was built around the same time as Angkor Thom, and like it was conceived as a whole city, though on a smaller scale. It was erected on the site of an important military victory and its outer perimeter is guarded by 72 stone garudas (winged mythological creatures depicted throughout Southeast Asia).


Bakong


One of the earliest temples in the region, Bakong was built in tiers within a strict geometric matrix, a style recognizable in the later Angkor Wat. Though significantly smaller than that complex, Bakong has a charm all its own.